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A remarkable discovery, well known within the Parkinson’s community and quite unknown to many others, is a potential link between this neurodegenerative disease and the unlocking of tremendous creative potential.  The EPDA is embarking on a new project which aims to raise awareness, inspire and encourage exploration of Parkinson’s creativity.  Through an immersive 3D journey and a platform of unique personal stories, resources and a rich showcase of powerful art, we invite you on a collaborative journey across Parkinson’s, the human brain and creativity.

About the Project, Creativity & Parkinson’s 

The EPDA is collaborating with artists, researchers, clinicians, institutes, and other interested organisations to make this project a reality.  So far, this is what we can tell you:

In 2022 we aim to launch a total immersive experience. It will be a journey inside the mechanisms of our brain and the links connecting Parkinson’s & creativity. The EPDA is currently developing the concept and the technology behind this innovative, 3D voyage into the brain guided by Prof. Mike Phillips (Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts and Director of iDAT Lab at Plymouth University, UK). 

If you are curious to learn about the link between Parkinson’s and creativity, please consult our shared online library containing scientific resources and relevant articles across Science, Tech & Art. It also includes video contributions by neuroscientists and will continue to grow over time.

Feel free to search, connect, and to propose additional content to be added.

Kathleen Reardon – “Beacon”

For clinical researchers, medical practitioners and any other professional focused on Parkinson's, the possible link between this condition and creativity represents intriguing potential for early diagnosis, rehabilitative therapy (Haaxma et al., 2015), and for a better understanding of non-motor symptoms (Chaudhuri et al., 2015; Martinez-Martin et al., 2011). Still, the answer for the underlying questions of why and how Parkinson's and related factors might actually combine to create such fascinating changes has not been resolved yet.

Nonetheless, this phenomenon has been causing people with Parkinson’s the world over to discover the artist within themselves; some exploding with bursts of creativity and others slowly and gradually answering the inner voice within them that seeks to creatively express itself. Such positive effect has improved their overall quality of life and helped people with Parkinson’s to reclaim identity and find new paths (Bloem, B. et al. 2018).

Understanding and exploring collaboratively such implications is therefore extremely important  to promote a greater understanding of the human experience, to encourage everyone to explore the positive benefits of creativity and to give renewed attention to art therapies for Parkinson’s treatment.

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